Video is King - 30+ Video Marketing Statistics in 2021

Video is King - 30+ Video Marketing Statistics in 2021
ByJulija A.
March 09,2021

It’s no secret that humans are visual creatures. We prefer it when information is presented to us through images and videos. High-speed internet connections have enabled us to do this better than ever before. 

In recent years, video has become more important for businesses than ever, and we’ve got video marketing statistics to prove it. What was once a nice add-on is now a crucial part of any well-developed marketing strategy. 

We’ve compiled a list that will shed some light on the state of video advertising in 2021 and show you how successful companies use video content to get their message across. You’ll get a sense of how this niche has evolved in recent years and what could be in store over the next decade or so.

If you’re eager to learn more, read on. 

Video Marketing Statistics—Highlights

  • Using video on landing pages can increase conversion by 86%.
  • 64% of marketers see video as the most difficult content to create.
  • More than 500 million hours of video are watched on YouTube every day.
  • 85% of Facebook videos are watched without sound.
  • 45% of people watch more than an hour of videos on Facebook or YouTube per week.
  • 69% of people prefer video over text when learning about a product or service.
  • 88% of marketers are satisfied with their social media video marketing ROI.
  • 68% of consumers said the COVID-19 pandemic has affected the amount of video content they watch online.

General Video Marketing Stats

Using video on landing pages could potentially increase conversion by up to 86%.

(Forbes)

Videos are easy to consume. Instead of sifting through an endless pile of information, you can just watch a short video and learn all you need to know about a product. For a company called Tutorvista, this strategy resulted in an 86% increase in conversions. Video-production firm Eyeview Digital took Tutorvista’s existing landing page and tested it against the same page with an autoplay video. The results were excellent.

Approximately 40% of marketers have reported that the coronavirus pandemic has affected their plans around video marketing.

(Wyzowl)

In light of the COVID-19 pandemic, 91% of marketers have found that video content has become much more important for branding. According to video marketing metrics, 60% of video content creators said the pandemic has affected their video marketing budget for 2021.

About 68% of consumers said the pandemic has directly impacted the amount of video content they’ve been watching online.

(Wyzowl)

The same survey revealed that the overwhelming majority of those who answered in the affirmative to the first question (96%) have been watching more video content due to the coronavirus pandemic.

Approximately 62% of video views are from mobile users.

(Ooyala)

Users are slowly but surely shifting their focus to mobile devices. Many prefer watching videos on their phone, so most video marketers now optimize their videos for mobile to match this trend.

On average, advertisers spent more than $16 million on video advertising in 2020.

(IAB)

Video marketing statistics indicate that this lucrative market will only keep growing with each passing year. It’s no wonder more companies are now investing in talented marketers who know how to make the best of video advertising.

64% of marketers see video as the most difficult content to create.

(OptinMonster)

Despite the popularity of video marketing, a lot of companies still haven’t figured out how to make video content easily and cheaply. While video production requires more resources and planning than other content, the results can more than make up for the initial investment.

Social Media Video Stats

45% of people watch more than an hour of Facebook or YouTube videos a week.

(Raw Shorts)

Watching a video on YouTube has become a part of the morning ritual. Consumers enjoy their favorite channels while they sip their morning coffee, or they use their lunch break to catch up on the latest news as they scroll through their Facebook feed.

Facebook’s global video ad revenue is expected to grow to $9.582 billion by the end of 2021.

(Statista)

Using video on social media is an easy way to reach more consumers. Ever since Facebook started enabling more video content, the company’s revenue has grown. Experts at Statista expect it to double by the end of 2021.

Images still account for 75–90% of Facebook ads.

(Consumer Acquisition)

Advertisers who haven’t yet embraced video advertising on Facebook are missing out. Adapting to the new standards is important for companies that don’t want to fall behind and lose their audiences to other brands.

85% of Facebook videos are watched without sound.

(Digiday)

Have you ever wondered how many videos are watched without sound? Apparently, the vast majority of them. What’s worse, data shows that 76% of videos need sound to be understood, so if you’re not careful your marketing efforts could go to waste. To resolve this, marketers can create videos where sound isn’t too important or use closed captioning. Closed captioning isn’t just there for the hard of hearing; brands can start using this feature to convince users that their video is worth watching.

How many videos are watched online per day? More than 500 million hours.

(Forbes)

These stats show us the sheer potential of YouTube for advertising. The number of consumers is huge, and despite the fact that some of them use AdBlock or similar filtering software, brands can still reach a lot of people with a well-placed ad. YouTube is available in 76 languages, so you won’t reach only English-speaking audiences. If these YouTube video statistics are anything to go by, the global market is in the palm of your hand.

62% of YouTube users in the United States accessed the video platform at least once per day in 2020.

(Statista)

YouTube is becoming a part of our daily routine. Millions of users visit this website a few times a day to see whether their favorite creators have posted anything new, or to watch a YouTube live video. While YouTube advertising cost can be high, it’s a worthwhile investment if you want to keep your audience engaged.

Most people watch YouTube during prime time, between 8 p.m. and 11 p.m.

(Think With Google)

People do consume a lot of video content on the go, but the most popular option remains prime time. Users enjoy both short and long content, so there’s a lot of opportunity for advertisers to reach a wide audience.

88% of marketers report success from using Instagram videos.

(Wyzowl)

As the most popular social media network at the moment, Instagram is doing a great job of driving up sales for marketers who use it correctly. Social media video statistics show that it’s even more effective than Twitter and Facebook, and brands that want to advertise effectively need to start implementing Instagram into their strategies.

Instagram’s ad revenue increased from $9.45 billion in 2019 to $13.86 billion in 2020.

(Statista)

How effective are video ads? For Instagram, they’re a home run. The company’s ad revenue in the US rose significantly in just a year, and marketers are making the best of this social network’s rising popularity. Instagram has more than a billion users at this point, so placing video ads there can give businesses huge reach. It is projected that the company will reach $18.16 billion in annual ad sales in the United States by the end of 2021.

The Instagram videos that receive the most comments are 26 seconds long on average.

(HubSpot)

Have you wondered how long should online videos be? Humans have short attention spans, and if you really want to capture the viewer’s gaze and have them take in your message, you have to respect their time. Videos of around 30 seconds are the best option for Instagram because they’re long enough to get any message across without feeling too intrusive to the consumer. Twitter and Facebook videos should also be as short as possible because users like to watch, like, and move on quickly, while YouTube allows for more in-depth, longer content.

Video Statistics and Consumer Habits

Close to 50% of online users search for product videos before they make a purchase.

(Think with Google)

Instead of going in blind, most users research the products they like before committing to a purchase. Online reviews are the most common way to figure out whether something is worth buying, but a lot of users also watch videos made by the company that sells the product.

85% of all internet users in the United States watch online video content at least monthly on any device.

(Statista)

All online video consumption statistics indicate that consumers spend a lot of time watching video content on different devices. Optimizing websites and videos for both mobile and desktop is important for any company that wants to make its content easily available to users.

69% of people prefer video over text when learning about a product or service.

(Wyzowl)

It’s easier for many people to learn important info by watching a video than by trawling through a block of text to find out about something. It saves them time, it’s more enjoyable, and it helps them learn all they need to know about the product.

Viewers retain 95% of the information after watching a video.

(Forbes)

Video marketing statistics show that text-only CTAs and brand messages are a lot less effective than video. Only 10% of the information is retained after reading a text once, and videos are shared 1,200% more than written content.

60% of people prefer online platforms to TV.

(Think With Google)

Watching online video platforms allows us to consume whatever we want, whenever we want. People are moving away from TV because YouTube allows them much more freedom to customize their viewing experience. The sheer convenience of watching things in your own time is more than enough to turn people away from TV and onto online videos.

(Think With Google)

The influencers with the most YouTube views not only have a lot of followers; those who do watch their content are extremely loyal. While they have lower reach than mainstream celebrities, they offer much better audience engagement. People find it easier to relate to influencers and are more likely to listen to their advice and product recommendations because they perceive influencers as honest.

The average user spends 88% more time on a website with video.

(Forbes)

Good video content can significantly reduce the bounce rate on your website. Brands can explain their products and services better through videos, and these video marketing statistics from Forbes show that people are more likely to stick around and continue exploring the site.

75% of consumers have decided against buying a product because the voiceover annoyed them.

(Wyzowl)

The voice of your video is the voice of your brand. Choosing the right tone and voice-over artist is important to represent your company the right way. But what is the right tone? Apparently, 83% of people say they prefer an informal, chatty voice over anything else.

More than 50% of people do a search after seeing a mobile ad.

(Think With Google)

Video marketing companies are enjoying great success. According to Google data, after seeing a video ad on their smartphone, more than half of people will do a quick search to check out the product.

Four in five consumers believe demo videos are helpful.

(Animoto)

Demo videos can be particularly beneficial if the product or service the company offers is complex. Users appreciate instructional content and they’re willing to trust the brand more if they get it.

Video Marketing Stats for Businesses

86% of businesses used video as a marketing tool in 2020.

(HubSpot)

More than four in five businesses have jumped aboard and started incorporating video into their marketing strategies. According to HubSpot, 99% of them are satisfied with the results and plan to keep using video in the year ahead. Of those who weren’t currently using video, 74% said they planned to start in 2019. This was a big jump compared to 2017, when only 34% of marketers planned to use this type of visual content.

Statistics show that 92% of marketers consider video an important part of their marketing strategy.

(Smart Insights)

Not only do marketers appreciate the effectiveness of a good video marketing strategy, but most believe video content will become even more important in the coming years. All trends indicate that this will almost certainly be the case.

Two in three advertisers will shift money away from their TV budget to fund their digital video advertising.

(IAB)

TV marketing certainly still has merit, but its popularity is slowly declining. Businesses generally get a much better ROI when investing in online video ads, so most companies now focus on digital marketing and producing engaging video content.

53% of consumers engage with a brand after viewing a video on social media.

(BrightCove)

Social media video statistics show that consumers learn about brands from their Facebook, Instagram, Twitter, and LinkedIn profiles. Posting interesting and informative videos will encourage users to share them on their own profiles. This will, in turn, increase your leads and spread the good word about your business.

88% of marketers are satisfied with their social media video marketing ROI.

(Animoto)

Although video creation can be time-consuming and require special software, most marketers are satisfied with its success. Using video content marketing can also be fairly expensive, but the high ROI can justify the costs and encourage managers to invest in a solid video strategy. The average ROI of video content on social media is 63%, followed by photography/graphics at 56%, and blog posts at 25%.

24% of marketers are using interactive video.

(inman)

Here’s even more evidence that visual content has an insanely high success rate. Real estate video marketing statistics show home listings that include a video of the house get a ton more inquiries. It’s easy to draw someone’s attention when they actually get a sneak peek of what they might be purchasing, and real estate is only one example of this. The same principle can apply to marketing any product or service.

23% of marketers have used interactive video.

(Wyzowl)

If you want to create video online, interactive videos are a good choice. Linear videos are now commonplace, but an interactive video can be more impressive because it’s relatively new to most users. You can include interactive elements like 360-degree views of a frame, hotspots, data inputs, and branches. About 78% of marketers describe this as a very effective business strategy, so it could work for your business.

Up to 73% of visitors who watch a video on an eCommerce site are more likely to make a purchase.

(Animoto)

Not a huge percentage of consumers watch eCommerce marketing videos, but those who do tend to spend more money on the product. For best results, brands should incorporate product videos into multiple parts of their website. From landing pages to category pages, companies should try to anticipate customer needs and answer their inquiries with well-placed visual information.

Studies show that 54% of consumers want to see more video content from a brand or business they support.

(HubSpot)

Consumers want their favorite brands to be more proactive. They have no problem dedicating their time to watching an online video if it provides entertaining or informative content. Video is currently in very high demand, and companies that don’t rush to meet the rising need risk falling behind and losing a lot of customers. If you want to grab the attention of your audience, well-curated video content is the way to go.

Marketers who use video get 83% more qualified leads annually.

(OptinMonster)

In addition to more leads per year, video marketing also boosts brand awareness by 54%. Better leads are generally the result of the quality and type of videos that are posted. If they are informative, entertaining, and above all memorable, consumers will share them and slowly help you build brand trust across social media. Good visuals can also build brand loyalty by helping the brand educate its customer base. A top-notch video will give potential customers a great insight into how to best use the products and services on offer.

70% of B2B customers watch videos on their path to purchase.

(Think With Google)

Videos work well for long sales cycles because they are personalized and scalable, and they can provide a lot of information that won’t take too long to digest. B2B video marketing statistics show that the majority of B2B customers watch videos to find out everything they can about a product or services before making a purchase. Well-curated video content also gives a brand the benefit of looking professional and knowledgeable, while also allowing the customer to make a genuine connection with a business more easily.

Video marketing increases organic traffic from search engines by 157%.

(Infographic Journal)

Google’s algorithms seem to prefer pages that include video content. The video infographic from Infographic Journal projected that 82% of all online traffic will come from videos by 2022, so you can understand the importance of optimizing your website accordingly.

To Sum It Up

Video is the future of content marketing. Incorporating it into your marketing strategy is a must if you want to stay on top and keep getting the conversions you need. It’s particularly important to focus on the social media aspect of your video marketing strategy.

Hopefully, these video marketing statistics have shed some light on the current state of advertising to help you create an optimized marketing plan for your brand. If you haven’t started investing in video content, there’s never been a better time than right now.

About author

Julia A. is a writer at SmallBizGenius.net. With experience in both finance and marketing industries, she enjoys staying up to date with the current economic affairs and writing opinion pieces on the state of small businesses in America. As an avid reader, she spends most of her time poring over history books, fantasy novels, and old classics. Tech, finance, and marketing are her passions, and she’s a frequent contributor at various small business blogs.

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