How to Get Clients in Real Estate: Top 10 Tips & Tricks

ByJulija A.
February 17,2022

To stay relevant in a highly competitive industry, realtors need to get up every morning thinking about one thing: how to get clients in real estate. 

In this lucrative market, an agent’s commission depends on a number of factors, but an average realtor fee is around 5%-6% of the sales price. Of course, even when the commission is just 1%-2%, agents stand to make thousands of dollars. 

Whether you’re just starting out or need to breathe fresh life into your real estate business, this guide will help you identify prospects and win contracts.

Getting Real Estate Clients: The Things That Matter  

Like in any other business, realtors are focused on attracting more clients by offering the right deals on different properties. To effectively engage with potential clients, realtors need to have an in-depth understanding of the latest trends in the housing market. But that’s not always enough when dealing with real estate clients with high expectations. Knowing how to get business in real estate requires an evolving strategy.

Some of the latest real estate statistics highlight the importance of developing an effective social media strategy while underscoring the industry’s cutthroat environment where more than two million real estate agents are competing for clients.  

How To Get a Piece of the Action

So how do realtors find clients, and what are the quickest and most cost-effective solutions? Being professional and knowledgeable is important, but you need to do more in today's landscape. To win over clients and ensure success, realtors have to exceed expectations.     

Below are a few critical real estate techniques for wheeling in clients in 2022.

#1. Boost your online visibility

Available data shows that up to 93% of prospective homebuyers research properties online. In fact, the internet is the most popular avenue for accessing brokerage services, with brick-and-mortar offices becoming obsolete. As such, an intuitive website should be the backbone of your real estate marketing strategy.

Outsourcing your website design and related activities can help you better identify the people interested in your properties. Regardless of whether you choose to call an expert or take the in-house approach, the following checklist will ensure you stand out from the crowd and attract more real estate clients:

  • Choose a suitable web host because any kind of downtime will put customers off.
  • Deliver an intuitive design that meets customer expectations of how a realtor website should be laid out.
  • Use a color scheme that matches your branding.
  • Ensure that the website is supported by on-site SEO tools to boost your Google presence and inspire organic traffic.
  • Protect your website with SSL encryption and other suitable cybersecurity tools.

Essentially, you must remember that the website should be built with two things in mind - potential clients and search engines. The design and speed of your website will attract users, while the mechanics pave the way for a strong online presence.

#2. Embrace social media

A strong online presence doesn’t begin and end with the website. Learning to link your social media channels to your website will instantly grow your visibility. 47% of realtors state that social media is the best tool for driving quality leads from real estate customers. You should be using Facebook, Twitter, Instagram, and Pinterest.

People interact with hundreds of brands each week. Even when actively looking for properties, they will probably interact with several agents and realtors. Using social media can help establish your company as the best choice while simultaneously gaining more leads in real estate. Here’s why:

  • Many people happily spend their time looking at properties on social media because it’s very convenient.
  • Viral content can establish your realtor business as an authoritative voice in the field.
  • More than 45% of consumers would rather communicate with businesses through instant messaging services than email.
  • Social media interactions keep your real estate company fresh in their minds and create extra touchpoints.
  • Users can follow the brand for updates while also saving relevant properties with ease.

Social media posts also allow you to look beyond sales and focus on forming long-lasting relationships with customers. Of course, all this increases the chances of converting real estate leads into real estate clients.

#3. Utilize other online channels

Your website and social media channels are controlled by you. However, you should also look to gain a strong online presence through third-party channels. For starters,  85% of consumers trust online reviews as much as personal referrals. So, encouraging existing and past clients to leave a review on verified third-party sources can work wonders.

There are many other ways to utilize the power of social proof and recommendation. Below are some of the most efficient solutions:

  • Look for link-building opportunities through suitable outreach strategies.
  • Get social media influencers to create content recommending your realtor services.
  • Make sure your business is listed on directory websites - both in your city and in the realtor sector.
  • Make your business appear on Google Maps and local searches with Google My Business because 46% of all Google searches are seeking local information.
  • Get press coverage and use a dedicated real estate CRM that allows interactive listings to be shown.

By successfully employing these methods, you’re enabling people to find you online even when they aren’t aware of the company. This can generate leads from people actively looking to buy/sell property while also keeping you in mind for their future needs.

#4. Meet people organically

Although the figures vary based on demographics, statistical data shows that the average person moves once every five years.  So, if you build a network of acquaintances throughout your life, there is a strong chance that at least some of them will be looking to buy or sell property in the near future.

Meeting people organically and building friendships can be achieved in many ways. Some options include:

  • Joining a volunteering scheme in your local area.
  • Supporting a worthy local cause, which also feeds into your bid for increased corporate social responsibility.
  • Attending local events and business networking events. 
  • Being more sociable in your daily life.
  • Ask friends and relatives to introduce you to anyone they know who is looking to move.

Building rapport can boost the sense of trust for your company while your passion for the job shines through. Better still, the path to conversion should be a lot smoother when these real estate clients are ready to act.

#5. Show professionalism

Every realtor understands the significance of a good first impression. These initial vibes have a huge impact on prospective homebuyers and sellers. Therefore, showing a sense of professionalism during those key interactions is vital.

Aside from gaining improved responses from potential leads in real estate, professionalism can also boost your self-confidence. To make the right impression by:

  • Investing in your beauty/grooming routines and fashion sense. Consumers tend to trust attractive and friendly-looking people.
  • Always carry business cards as you never know when a connection could be made. 
  • Always have a printed brochure for the property or a list of the properties currently available.
  • Keep a record of recent sales to show what you can do for a client while also providing insights into current market trends.
  • Consider taking a body language course because nonverbal cues are a critical part of communication.

Clients want professionalism in all business matters. However, it is particularly vital when dealing with clients in real estate because it is a huge decision for a buyer or seller - financially and in terms of their happiness.

#6. Establish yourself as an authoritative voice

Aside from the fact that one-in-three homebuyers are first-time buyers, it should be noted that real estate prices have increased by 73% since 2000. With so much on the line, people are putting a great deal of confidence in your realtor company. Arguably the best way to get clients is to avoid reaching out to them and let them reach out to you.

When conducting their research, people will read up on the real estate industry and take note of the names that appear to be knowledgeable. So, you may want to consider:

  • Creating content such as blogs, podcasts, and vlogs to give valuable insight and educate your future clients
  • Providing a guest column for local newspapers or appearing as a guest on local media
  • Making a clear portfolio of all your clients and celebrating any accolades
  • Being happy to interact with people and answer questions through social media or by creating a FAQ page on your website
  • Organizing networking events or classes for buyers, sellers, and other interested parties

The real estate you try to sell on behalf of clients will sell itself as long as you present and price it correctly. However, human interactions are an important aspect in the client’s decision-making process. Prove your value, and you’ll win more contracts.

#7. Empower your team

The vast majority of consumers believe the way a company treats its employees is a measure of trustworthiness. Furthermore, you’ll find that your employees are responsible for many of the client interactions. So if you want to know how to get business in real estate sectors, establishing a sense of consistency across all teams is vital.

In addition to realtors and salespeople, your team may include mortgage advisors, receptionists, and other valuable staff members. Some of the best ways to build a better team include:

  • Going the extra mile to enhance your recruitment processes
  • Investing in a clear mission statement and vision statement that underlines your purpose as a realtor
  • Investing in valuable staff training practices to ensure all employees deliver consistent experiences for potential buyers and sellers
  • Implementing wardrobe guidelines and using company cars to help your agents make a better first impression
  • Making yourself available as a mentor or simply answer questions your staff may have

Running a successful real estate business cannot be a one-person show. By building the strongest possible team, you’re giving yourself the best chance of winning real estate clients while putting your mind at ease.

#8. Show that you understand them

52% of homebuyers say the main purpose of a real estate agent is to find their desired property. So, in order to provide the best service as a realtor, you need to understand people as well as properties. After all, the assignment isn’t to help them find the perfect property - it is to find the perfect property for the client. When it comes to handling a seller, it’s about getting the right price.

Clients looking for a property will give you a few chances to get it right but will soon look elsewhere if you keep showing them the wrong properties. Get to know them by:

  • Actively listening to what they tell you about their dream home and, more importantly, their priorities.
  • Being honest with them throughout the entire process, especially when it comes to their budget and the fees they can expect to face.
  • Looking into issues that may affect them most, such as commute times or local attractions.
  • Where possible, showing evidence of past examples where you’ve helped clients in similar positions.
  • Staying in regular contact with them throughout the process.

The final point is of particular importance because most people will naturally wrestle with their decision for months before making a commitment. If you want to know how to get clients in real estate, persistence is key. A good CRM software that helps you to follow up is vital.

#9. Look to new avenues

Just under two-thirds of American families own their primary place of residency. So, one of the best ways to win new clients in real estate is to branch out. This allows you to reach new demographics and avoid the threat of hitting a bad patch if the market takes a plunge.

Here are a few ways to secure more leads in real estate:

  • Work with landlords, as over 35% of homes are rented.
  • Look at land and home packages in the fields of agriculture.
  • Work at commercial properties.
  • Branch out to other states or international markets.
  • Add luxury homes or family homes to your existing platform.

In addition to exploring new markets, you should also consider new services. Offering a property management service to landlords or free virtual tour video creation to home sellers may give you the edge and help you get more real estate customers.

#10. Build your network

The real estate SOI or sphere of influence is a powerful tool that allows you to make the most of your contacts as well as word-of-mouth referrals. With this in mind, building your network should be an ongoing process. While organic network building through non-business matters is great, you should not ignore the benefits of direct real estate networking.

You can bolster your network with a range of SOI real estate endeavors, such as:

  • Hosting open houses for experienced agents.
  • Directly working with other agents, especially on bigger contracts.
  • Capturing relevant contact details while working open houses.
  • Handing out business cards to friends, family, and local businesses.
  • Joining a luxury real estate council.

The realtor game isn’t just about properties. It’s also about people, and the sooner you realize this, the better. The best estate agents don’t just sell homes; they sell dreams. A larger network allows you to match the right home to the right person.

Conclusion

Knowing how to get clients in real estate isn’t the only part of making your realtor business work, but it is the most important. To get the desired results, you may have to present yourself in a more effective way, revamp your real estate marketing techniques, or reach out to new audiences in different areas of the market. One way or another, attracting and dealing with clients in real estate is an ongoing process.

The grind never stops. But when you get it right, your business will be as safe as houses.

Frequently Asked Questions
How do you attract real estate clients?

There are many ways to get more real estate clients, but a growing number of realtors are relying on the digital space. Through a combination of paid advertising and organic traffic gained through search engines and social media, you’re bound to see results. Word-of-mouth referrals can be very rewarding too.

Is it hard to get clients as a real estate agent?

There are over two million realtors to compete with, and many sellers will look to real estate marketing from several vendors. However, if you show an understanding of the market and the buyer/seller’s needs, you can win the contract. Of course, reaching out through the right avenues is key.

What is cold calling in real estate?

Cold calling in real estate is when agents look for new clients by making calls and advertising their services. There is an ongoing debate about the efficiency of this method. Some feel that knocking on doors and putting up leaflets with your contact details are more effective methods to gain interest.

Who is the target market for real estate?

The real estate target audience is homebuyers and sellers. You can provide realtor services to either party and gain your commission accordingly. For some companies, landlords and tenants may also be involved.

About the author

Julia A. is a writer at SmallBizGenius.net. With experience in both finance and marketing industries, she enjoys staying up to date with the current economic affairs and writing opinion pieces on the state of small businesses in America. As an avid reader, she spends most of her time poring over history books, fantasy novels, and old classics. Tech, finance, and marketing are her passions, and she’s a frequent contributor at various small business blogs.

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