How To Find Angel Investors and Kick-Start Your Business

ByDanica Djokic
May 18,2022

Even though they aren’t easy to find, angels do exist and are definitely worth the quest. Keep in mind, though, that they dwell solely in the world of entrepreneurship. This article will provide some insightful tips and tricks on how to find angel investors so that you can start funding your startup and seeing your professional dreams come true.

What Are Angel Investors, and What Do They Do?

Angel investors are a special breed of investors. They are typically high-net-worth individuals who invest their own money in early-stage startups. Their motives stem from believing in the company and its team and wishing to see the startup succeed. 

Unlike venture capital firms and venture capitalists, angel investors are not looking for a quick return on their investment. They are willing to wait longer to obtain profit and are often hands-on with the companies they invest in. Taking on more risk than traditional investors, angel investors typically require a higher rate of return on their funding. Consequently, they can earn a much higher payoff once the company has become successful. Due to the uncertainty involved in this type of financing, finding angel investors might be a bit tricky. 

Angel investors are an essential source of funding for early-stage startups. They provide the capital indispensable for startups to get off the ground and grow. In addition to bringing capital, angel investors often serve as mentors and advisers, helping founders tackle the challenges of building a successful business. Without them, many promising companies would never have gotten started.

How To Find Angel Investors for Your Startup

Here are some tips and tricks that’ll help you navigate the sphere of entrepreneurship and inspire angel investors to bestow their benevolence upon your startup:

1. Do Your Research

The first step in raising capital for your venture is conducting preliminary research. It’s a good idea to identify investors who are the best fit for your company based on their previous activities. There are a number of resources available online that can help you with this process. The Angel Investor Directory, for example, lists angel investors by state, mentioning what their preferred sectors are. You can also optimize your hunt for a perfect angel investor on websites such as AngelList, a popular platform that connects startups with potential backers. It has funded more than 12,000 startups and has $10 billion in assets supported. 

In addition, you can create a profile with Gust, a global platform that provides angel groups with tools to facilitate quality investments, or Angel Investment Network, another great website that brings together businesses and investors. 

Finally, we recommend you join the Angel Capital Association, the world's largest network of angel investors with a community of more than 13,000 accredited investors.

2. Contact Angel Investor Networks

If you’d like to know how to find legitimate angel investors, the best advice is to network at all times. Start connecting with as many people in the startup community as possible. Attend startup events and meetups, getting to know the angels who are already investing in startups. These connections will give you a chance to encounter an aspiring angel investor who might be interested in your company. 

Once you get to know the right people, they may be able to introduce you to future investors. Focus on business owners, as they will likely think about funding small businesses at one point in their entrepreneurial journey. If you’re wondering where to find angel investors, you should join business associations, civic and community organizations, and attend trade fairs and events. Mingling with like-minded individuals will help increase your chances of bumping into the right angel investor.

3. Use Social Media

Social media is a convenient tool that can be used to connect with corporate investors. An excellent platform for connecting with business professionals, LinkedIn is a good way to find out about investment opportunities. Twitter is another useful platform that can help small business owners secure early-stage funding. You can promote your company on Twitter and reach out to future investors. 

To find an angel investor that’s a right fit for your business, you can also use Facebook. By posting regularly, you can promote your company and connect with angel groups. Start by telling your story, then build an audience, and inspire some of them to reach out to you first. If not, don't be afraid to make the first step and get in touch with potential investors.

4. Give Presentations

Presenting your business idea and strategy is another excellent way to connect with those who could provide the funding your startup needs. This is an opportunity to showcase your company in front of a group of people and get them excited about the work that your company is involved in. If you're planning on giving a presentation, make sure it's professional and engaging. You want to leave a lasting impression on possible investors, so make sure your presentation is polished and bulletproof.

Your story is what will make you stand out from the hundreds of other startups pitching to investors. Tell a narrative that captures the attention of potential angel investors for startups and makes them eager to invest in your operations. Focus on why you're starting your business, which unmet need you’re addressing, and how you're going to make money.

5. Make an Impactful Pitch Deck

Looking for an angel investor can be a daunting task. Once you've identified potential investors, the next step is to pitch your business ideas. Devising an effective pitch deck is a critical piece of the puzzle as it will be the first impression that investors have of your company. Make sure that your pitch deck is clear, concise, and persuasive. Investors should be able to understand your business model and see the potential for growth. It’s also advisable to indicate what’s in it for them if they decide to provide backing.

Angel investing requires having a meticulous plan in place, so make sure to include key data points around projected revenues and market share to demonstrate the potential of your vision and business model. Here’s how to find angel investors for your idea and pitch your business at the same time: include a clear description of your accomplishments and team capabilities based on their track records, as well as details about your current stage of funding or development. Ultimately, the objective of your pitch deck should be to show that you have what it takes to bring your concept to fruition.

6. Try Online Crowdfunding

Crowdfunding is a great way to raise money for your business, and it's also a chance to connect with potential angel investors. When you run a successful crowdfunding campaign, it shows potential investors that there is interest in your company. Attracting individuals who are willing to fund your business idea then becomes a piece of cake.

There are a few crowdfunding platforms you can use while looking for angel investors, such as Kickstarter, Indiegogo, and GoFundMe. Choose a platform that's right for your business and start promoting your campaign. Statistics show that successful crowdfunding campaigns raise an average of $33,430, so why not give it a try and see if you can spot some angels along the way.

7. Ask Family and Friends

Seeking investment from those who are closest to you for the project you believe in can be a great idea. But before you start sending out feelers, it is important to understand that this comes with its own challenges.

Knowing how to find angel investors among family and friends is a skill that can bring in substantial funding. When raising money from your loved ones, it’s essential to set expectations from the beginning and agree on certain boundaries. This means being clear about how much money you are looking to raise and what the terms of the investment will be. 

Another thing to keep in mind is that, while your relatives might be personally invested in your venture and therefore quite forgiving, you still need to make sure that you are using their money wisely. It’s best to have a solid business plan and direct the funds solely toward growing your business.

What To Look For in an Angel Investor?

When learning how to find and convert angel investors, you should take certain factors into consideration. First and foremost, ensure that you’ve chosen someone whose previous performance has been exemplary. An accredited investor who has a history of successful investments will be much more likely to help your venture succeed as well. Additionally, it’s important to seek out an investor who shares your long-term vision and values. This will help you avoid any potential conflict down the road and ensure that your company is aligned with your investors’ interests. 

It’s always prudent to seek out angels with deep pockets. Knowing who angel investors are and how to find them isn’t enough if they don’t have ample funds. Whether they have access to large amounts of capital or just a strong network of investors, having financial support from multiple sources can help keep your company on track during difficult times.

When approaching individuals whose wealth can contribute to your business, don’t forget their mentorship ability. A capable angel investor should provide professional guidance alongside financing. As they have likely been through the startup process, they could offer advice on everything from developing a business plan to hiring employees. Having a seasoned mentor on your side can help you avoid common mistakes and make the most of your limited resources.

Bottom Line

Now that you know how to find real angel investors who possess the right combination of skill and resources, you can onboard someone to take your company to new heights! It’s good to have realistic expectations, though. Not every potential investor will be interested in your business, and you should not take it personally if they decline to invest. 

Remember that even the most promising startup will likely face challenges and setbacks along the way. That’s why you should be prepared for bumps in the road and have a solid plan for how you will overcome them. With hard work and dedication, you can achieve your goals and make your business thrive.

FAQ
Is it hard to find angel investors?

Yes, it can be challenging to find someone to back your business idea in its developmental stages. However, if you have a solid business plan and an appealing pitch, asking yourself “How do I find angel investors?” doesn’t have to leave you in a quandary. You are likely to find someone who is interested in helping your business grow if they are able to identify its market advantages and see its potential to bring in revenue. The tricky part can be choosing an investor who shares your long-term vision and values, so engaging in comprehensive research is essential. In your introductory conversations with potential investors, it’s a good idea to be upfront and honest, so that both parties are aware of what they are committing to.

What percentage do angel investors want?

An angel investor typically takes 20%-25% of the company profit. Keeping in mind how hard it is to find angel investors, these amounts shouldn’t be an issue. But be aware that the cost of an angel investor can vary depending on a number of factors, including the amount of money being invested and the investor’s level of experience. Investors’ expenses such as due diligence checks and legal fees should also be taken into account as they increase the overall cost.

Is angel investing a good idea?

Yes, angel investing can be an excellent idea for a number of reasons. First and foremost, angel investors can provide access to much-needed capital. Additionally, they can offer mentorship and guidance, which can be invaluable for young businesses. Finally, angel investors often have helpful insights and connections that can contribute to your business growth. However, this whole concept can be quite risky. Once you've accepted an angel's money, you'll likely be giving up a significant amount of control over your company.

What do angel investors expect in return?

Now that you know how to find angel investors, you can screen potential ones to ensure that their expectations align with your plans and won’t deter you from achieving your business goals. However, bear in mind that they typically expect a stake in the company they're investing in, as well as involvement in key decisions that affect the company's future.

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